Gerard A Blane Podiatry

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Athlete's Foot

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What is Athlete's Foot?

Athlete's Foot is one of the most common skin diseases. Typical symptoms are sore, painful, itchy skin, between and under the toes. There are also likely to be areas of soft, moist, broken skin. In severe cases the nails, together with the tissue around the nails, the nail fold, may also become infected. Sometimes, small, itchy blisters may develop at some distance from the original site of infection. This is most likely to be an alergic reaction to the infection, rather than the infection spreading.

How is it caused?

The infection is caused by a fungus which affects the outer, superficial layers of the skin. This fungal infection may be caught at swimming baths, in communal changing rooms, and sometimes through the shared use of articles such as towels.

Once caught. the fungus thrives in warm, moist,sweaty conditions. It is therefor particularly troublesome in the summer months. It is frequently aggravated by the wearing of synthetic shoes, stockings or socks, which may not allow the feet to 'breath' properly

What can you do?

your poiatrist can help you get rid of athlete's foot by prescribing anti-fungal cream, either alone, or in combination with an anti-fungal powder to dust onto your feet.

You can help the treatment to work if you follow these simple self help tips:

  • Although the infected will itch, do not scratch. Scratching will damage the surface of the skin and help the infection spread further.
  • Wash the affected areas of the skin regularly and carefully.
  • Pay partucular attention to drying the skin, especially between the toes.
  • Try to wear leather shoes and non-synthetic hosiery whenever possible to allow your feet to breath and to reduce sweating.
  • If your nails are affected they should be cut short.

And remember

ALWAYS follow the instructions the podiatrist has given you regarding treatment

ALWAYS use the full course of treatment

NEVER use any old creams you have found in the medicin cabinet. these may be totally inapropriate.

Copyed with kind permission from The society of Chiropodists and podiatrists SCp 44 52
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